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Japanese anime director Takashi Saijo explains difference in classic and modern animation techniques

Saijo said he advises aspiring animators and artists to study at animation schools for at least two years, in order to learn the techniques to capture the Japanese culture in anime. (Supplied)
Saijo said he advises aspiring animators and artists to study at animation schools for at least two years, in order to learn the techniques to capture the Japanese culture in anime. (Supplied)
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12 Oct 2020 05:10:14 GMT9
12 Oct 2020 05:10:14 GMT9

Amin Abbas Dubai

Japanese anime director Takashi Saijo worked on classic and major anime series such as: Speed Racer (Mach GoGoGo), Judo Boy, Time Bokan, Fist of the North Star (Hokuto No Ken), Naruto Shippūden, Metropolis and One Piece Film Strong World.

In an exclusive interview with Arab News Japan, Saijo shared his inspiration for Japanese anime culture, saying, “I enjoy many classic works and stories from years ago, my favorite anime series is Yatterman and my favorite manga is Tsurikichi Sanpei.”

Speaking of the establishment of his career in animation industry, Saijo said: “I’ve been working since 1966. My brother was also an animator and I was enamored by the work and this is why I started it.”

He said his animation project was Speed Racer (Mach GoGoGo), which is considered as one of the “most memorable and successful shows by Tatsunoko Productions,” especially in the US.

About the challenges that he faced during these projects, the Japanese animator said: “When I started doing Disney animation, for The Little Mermaid and Darkwing Duck, after working on Japanese animation, the difference in the scenes and character’s movement was difficult. It took a lot of work to do good animation for it [the project].”

Saijo said animation has changed in terms of quality and concept compared to the past.

“Animation took a major distinct route when celluloid film changed to digital where animators today use the power of computers and advance drawing devices for doing animation to save time,” he explained. “It allows them to do more effects than before.”

Saijo said he advises aspiring animators and artists to study at animation schools for at least two years, in order to learn the techniques to capture the Japanese culture in anime.

“Japanese anime has a particular world view. Some examples of this are how pictures are represented, a particular type of movement as well as a way of adding shadows while ignoring solid objects,” he said.

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