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Starbucks Japan bridges culture and coffee at new store

The coffee shops’ interior and exterior both depend on a natural look and feel, integrating elements like wood in the overall aesthetic while also maintaining a minimalist and traditional design. (Starbucks Japan)
The coffee shops’ interior and exterior both depend on a natural look and feel, integrating elements like wood in the overall aesthetic while also maintaining a minimalist and traditional design. (Starbucks Japan)
The coffee shops’ interior and exterior both depend on a natural look and feel, integrating elements like wood in the overall aesthetic while also maintaining a minimalist and traditional design. (Starbucks Japan)
The coffee shops’ interior and exterior both depend on a natural look and feel, integrating elements like wood in the overall aesthetic while also maintaining a minimalist and traditional design. (Starbucks Japan)
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09 Apr 2021 02:04:29 GMT9
09 Apr 2021 02:04:29 GMT9

Shams El-Mutwalli Dubai

Starbucks Japan is not only renowned for their coffee, but the multinational coffeehouse chain is also well recognized for their unique venues that are scattered around Japan, this includes their newly opened branch located near Mie prefecture’s Ise Grand Shrine.

The coffee shops’ interior and exterior both depend on a natural look and feel, integrating elements like wood in the overall aesthetic while also maintaining a minimalist and traditional design.

The structure and layout of the coffee shop is quaint as it has two floors, with the seating area located upstairs to offer an unhindered view of the town through the floor-to-ceiling windows.

The Edo architectural influence can be identified by the wooden façade of the coffee shop that blends into the town’s neighbouring structures.

The inspiration for this branch stems from the architectural history of the Oharai-machi area, and the 2,000 year-old Ise Grand Shrine.

Other subtle elements like the noren—or Japanese curtains—that line the outer entrance, simple, floral illustrations on the café’s white walls, and wooden seating create a warm and welcoming atmosphere for customers.

Starbucks’ iconic logo adopts a more simplistic look at this branch, as the infamous two-tailed mermaid is embossed on a white panel outside, which contrasts with the traditional white and green typically seen.

Other notable branches include Starbucks’ Hokkaido branch located inside a historic Meiji building, the Saitama wooden warehouse coffee shop, and their Yomiuriland’s Hana Biyori garden branch—located inside a greenhouse.

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