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  • Bahrain updates COVID-19 measures amid global surge in coronavirus infections

Bahrain updates COVID-19 measures amid global surge in coronavirus infections

A picture taken on December 3, 2020, shows the world trade centre (R) and the skyline of the Bahraini capital Manama. (File/AFP)
A picture taken on December 3, 2020, shows the world trade centre (R) and the skyline of the Bahraini capital Manama. (File/AFP)
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08 Jan 2022 05:01:25 GMT9
08 Jan 2022 05:01:25 GMT9
  • Kingdom will increase COVID-19 rapid testing for employees across Bahrain’s vital sectors
Arab News

DUBAI: Bahrain has updated its COVID-19 measures due to a rapid growth in coronavirus infections across the globe.

Bahrain’s updates will be implemented starting Jan. 9, the state news agency BNA reported.

The country said it will increase its PCR testing for those experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, as well as individuals who have a positive rapid antigen test, and those who have been in close contact with active coronavirus cases.  

Similarly, the Kingdom will increase the COVID-19 rapid testing for employees across Bahrain’s vital sectors.

Vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals arriving in the country must present a negative PCR test result issued no more than 72 hours before landing.

They will also be required to take another nasal test upon arrival.

“Unvaccinated individuals aged 12 years and above must complete a 10-day quarantine in their residence or place of stay,” the report said.

The Kingdom said that the rollout of its vaccination campaign will run at the same pace, with 
isolation and treatment centers operating at their current capacities.

Omicron is behind rapid virus spikes in several countries, including those where it has already overtaken the previously-dominant Delta variant, the WHO said in its COVID-19 weekly epidemiological update.

The more infectious omicron variant of COVID-19 appears to produce less severe disease than the globally dominant Delta strain, but should not be categorized as “mild,” World Health Organization (WHO) officials said on Thursday.

Janet Diaz, WHO lead on clinical management, said early studies showed there was a reduced risk of hospitalization from the variant first identified in southern Africa and Hong Kong in November compared with Delta.

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