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Suga leaves open Lower House breakup on no-confidence motion

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga attends a plenary session, during the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. (AP)
Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga attends a plenary session, during the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, England, Sunday, June 13, 2021. (AP)
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14 Jun 2021 04:06:17 GMT9
14 Jun 2021 04:06:17 GMT9

CORNWALL (England): Japanese Prime Minister SUGA Yoshihide did not rule out on Sunday the possibility of dissolving the House of Representatives for a snap election if opposition parties submit a no-confidence motion against his cabinet.

“I will consider if (such a motion) is submitted,” Suga told reporters accompanying him on his visit to Cornwall, southwestern England, to attend the Group of Seven summit meeting.

“My term has been set. (A Lower House dissolution) can take place anytime from now,” Suga also said.

Suga’s term as president of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party expires at end of September. The next Lower House election needs to be held by autumn.

The main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan and other opposition parties plan to decide whether to submit a no-confidence motion after Suga returns to Japan on Monday, in response to the ruling coalition’s reply to their request for an extension of the current parliamentary session, which ends on Wednesday.

In connection with a Lower House dissolution, Suga also said top priority should be given to measures against the novel coronavirus, adding that he will devote his full effort to the promotion of COVID-19 vaccinations.

On LDP Secretary-General Toshihiro Nikai’s management of the party, Suga said: “He has been exercising leadership. I highly evaluate him as I can concentrate on government affairs.” There are calls within the LDP for replacing Nikai.

Explaining his brief contact with South Korean President Moon Jae-in during the G-7 summit, Suga said, “I greeted him in an effort to be respectful.”

But Japan and South Korea cannot hold a formal summit meeting under current conditions, according to Suga.

“Japan-South Korea ties have become very soured due to South Korean moves. We are not in such a situation (that allows for a summit) as promises between countries are not being honored,” he said.

He effectively called for positive responses from South Korea on the issues of wartime labor and former comfort women, who served as prostitutes for Japanese troops before and during World War II. The two governments have reached landmark agreements to resolve these issues once and for all, but South Korean court rulings have ordered Japan and Japanese companies to pay compensation.

JIJI Press

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