Since 1975
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • instagram
  • Home
  • US urges Houthis to ‘match Saudi commitment to ending Yemen war’

US urges Houthis to ‘match Saudi commitment to ending Yemen war’

A woman sits with her children at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of Houthi-occupied Sanaa as Iran-backed militias continue their attacks. (Reuters)
A woman sits with her children at a camp for internally displaced people on the outskirts of Houthi-occupied Sanaa as Iran-backed militias continue their attacks. (Reuters)
Short Url:
02 Mar 2021 12:03:28 GMT9
02 Mar 2021 12:03:28 GMT9
  • Halting Marib attack is ‘necessary first step’
  • Kingdom pledges $430m at UN donor conference

Ephrem Kossaify & Saeed Al-Batati

NEW YORK, AL-MUKALLA: Saudi Arabia is “committed and eager” to find a way to end the war in Yemen and Iran-backed Houthi militias should do the same, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said on Monday.

“The necessary first step is to stop their offensive against Marib, a city where a million internally displaced people live, and to join the Saudis and the government in Yemen in making constructive moves toward peace,” Blinken said.

Speaking after a visit to the region by his Yemen envoy Tim Lenderking, Blinken told a UN humanitarian aid conference: “He reports that the Saudis and the Yemen government are committed and eager to find a solution to the conflict. We call on the Houthis to match this commitment.”

Monday’s donor conference raised $1.7 billion, less than half the $3.85 billion the UN was seeking for 2021 to avert a large-scale famine. Among the commitments were $430 million from Saudi Arabia, $191 million from the US, $230 million from the UAE and $240 million from Germany.

“Millions of Yemeni children, women and men desperately need aid to live. Cutting aid is a death sentence,” UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said.

“The best that can be said about today is that it represents a down-payment. I thank those who did pledge generously, and I ask others to consider again what they can do to help stave off the worst famine the world has seen in decades.”

The amount raised “does not solve the problem,” UN humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock said. “It’s going to be impossible with such limited resources to prevent a large-scale famine.

“We are at a crossroads with Yemen. We can choose the path to peace or let Yemenis slide into the world’s worst famine for decades. An adequately funded aid operation will prevent the spread of famine and create the conditions for lasting peace. If you’re not feeding the people, you’re feeding the war.”

In Yemen, local health officials said they hoped the new funds would be directed to the health sector.

Dr. Ahmed Mansour, a health official in the southern city of Taiz, told Arab News that health facilities were in desperate need of funds and medical supplies to fight off a new wave of coronavirus.

“We are in need of ventilators, drugs and personal protective equipment, and renovating health buildings,” he said.

Most Popular
Recommended

return to top