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Japan, Finland confirm unity in dealing with Russia

Finland's Prime Minister Sanna Marin shakes hands with Japan’s Prime Minister Fumio Kishida during their meeting at the latters official residence in Tokyo, Japan, May 11, 2022. (Reuters)
Finland's Prime Minister Sanna Marin shakes hands with Japan’s Prime Minister Fumio Kishida during their meeting at the latters official residence in Tokyo, Japan, May 11, 2022. (Reuters)
Finland's Prime Minister Sanna Marin and Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida look on as Ambassador of Finland to Japan, Pekka Orpana, and Ambassador of Japan to Finland, Kazuhiro Fujimura, present documents during a signing ceremony at Kishida's official residence, in Tokyo, Japan, May 11, 2022. (Reuters)
Finland's Prime Minister Sanna Marin and Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida look on as Ambassador of Finland to Japan, Pekka Orpana, and Ambassador of Japan to Finland, Kazuhiro Fujimura, present documents during a signing ceremony at Kishida's official residence, in Tokyo, Japan, May 11, 2022. (Reuters)
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12 May 2022 12:05:15 GMT9
12 May 2022 12:05:15 GMT9

TOKYO: Japanese Prime Minister KISHIDA Fumio and his Finnish counterpart, Sanna Marin, on Wednesday confirmed unity in dealing with Russia, which is invading Ukraine.

They also shared concerns over China, which is making increasingly hegemonic moves, and exchanged opinions about plans to realize a free and open Indo-Pacific region.

Kishida and Marin confirmed that countries sharing universal values will respond to Russia in a united way.

They also shared the view that as security in Europe and the Indo-Pacific region is inseparable, any unilateral attempts to change the status quo by force are unacceptable.

Regarding the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Kishida told a joint press conference that the world is at “a critical moment to end the atrocious aggression.”

“Finland is a strong advocate of further sanctions against Russia,” Marin told the press conference.

Regarding her country’s possible application for NATO membership, Marin said, “If Finland takes this historical step, it is for the security of our own citizens.”

“Joining NATO would strengthen the whole international community that stands for our common values,” she added.

Sharing a 1,300-kilometer border with Russia, Finland has long maintained military neutrality. In response to the Russian aggression against Ukraine, however, Finland is expected to decide shortly whether to seek NATO membership.

Kishida and Marin also discussed the security environment in Asia. She expressed concern about China, saying that Beijing may be plotting ways to use its power.

JIJI Press

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